Saturday, June 15, 2013

The Case of Vegetable Kebabs

Here's a letter I wrote to my larger-than-I-would-like-to-be self on the advice of a self-help book that I read about losing weight. Note: I responded to myself at a later date but that will not be published.                        

FROM: REBEKKAH GREEN
BEAUTIFUL THINGS
CO-OWNER
32 MAIN STREET
BLACK CURRANT BAY ON

TO: REBEKKAH GREEN THE LARGER
SAME ADDRESS

May 21, 2012

Dear Rebekkah (may I leave out the Larger?)

I know you’re a nice person, Rebekkah, so I’m assuming you’ll read this and reflect on it and not rip my head off even if you want to. Please do not internalize what I’m about to say. I suspect you’re prone to do that; however, just because this is a chastising letter doesn’t mean that I don’t like you. I do like you. Very much. You’re good and kind and actually too damn accommodating!

When others eat, you eat with them to be polite. If you don’t like something, you eat it anyway so as not to offend. You make birthday cakes for people even though you know you’ll get stuck with the leftovers. The result of all that niceness is you’re…well…plump.

Let me repeat, I like and respect you. I believe it’s not what you do or what you have or what you look like that counts. It’s who you are. And you’re terrific.

Here’s the thing. You can remain nice and still be thin. There’s no law against it. See, when it comes right down to it, you won’t be breaking anyone’s heart if you insist on going to the grocery store and buying ingredients for a delightfully fresh salad instead of agreeing to take the easy road and going to Harvey’s. Maybe someone you and I both know will even offer to help clean up after the healthy meal when you are time-strapped.

I think you get the message. Put your own welfare first for once. Your own health. Your own self-esteem. Your own joy. You deserve to be the best Rebekkah you can be. A little more like me—your ideal self.

Yours (and I mean that literally),

Rebekkah


Grrr... Here's the recipe.

Vegetable Kebabs

2 rounded tsps (for 2 cups) vegetable bouillon powder
2 tbsps hickory-smoked barbecue sauce
1 tsp vinegar
1/2 cup boiling water
2 tbsps soya sauce
4 cloves garlic, minced
pinch paprika
pinch rosemary
pinch oregano
pinch onion powder
pinch basil
pinch parsley
pepper
16 oz medium mushrooms
2 red peppers, cubed
4 zucchinis, thickly sliced
1/8 cup olive oil

Soak at least 8 wooden skewers in water.

Mix together all the marinade ingredients—vegetable bouillon powder to pepper to taste—in a large bowl. Add the vegetables and marinate for an hour or more.

Thread the vegetables on the skewers, baste with the olive oil, and grill on the BBQ or broil on the middle rack of oven.

Serve on Creamy Whipped Potatoes and Chick Peas and drizzle with warmed marinade.

Serves 4.

Becki

PS To leave me (and Cynthia) a message, click on the comment button below.

Sunday, June 9, 2013

The Case of Poutine

"Poutine is a typical Canadian dish (originally from Quebec), made with French fries, topped with brown gravy and curd cheese."—Wikipedia

Nutritionists worldwide may be screaming in horror that poutine has captured the world by storm but proud Canadian that I am, I'm shouting, "Yippee!"

To be sure, vegetarians are reputed to eat more along the lines of tofu, broccoli and brown rice but an occasional poutine won't kill us. In fact, fast-food poutine makes quite a comforting indulgence!

Did you know that poutine gravy, which is generally made from a mix, is vegetarian? Valerie of McCormick Canada Inc. confirmed to me by phone that Club House Brown Gravy Mix contains no meat products.

Silly to write out a recipe. All you do is sprinkle French fries with cheese curds then pour brown gravy over top. Seriously...yum!

♥ Becki

PS To leave me (and Cynthia) a message, click on the comment button below.